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Welcome to our collection of quotes (with shareable picture quotes) by Blaise Pascal. We hope you enjoy pondering them and that you will share them widely.

Wikipedia Summary for Blaise Pascal

Blaise Pascal ( pask-AL, also UK: -⁠AHL, PASK-əl, -⁠al, US: pah-SKAHL; French: [blɛz paskal]; 19 June 1623 – 19 August 1662) was a French mathematician, physicist, inventor, philosopher, writer and Catholic theologian.

He was a child prodigy who was educated by his father, a tax collector in Rouen. Pascal's earliest mathematical work was on conic sections; he wrote a significant treatise on the subject of projective geometry at the age of 16. He later corresponded with Pierre de Fermat on probability theory, strongly influencing the development of modern economics and social science. In 1642, while still a teenager, he started some pioneering work on calculating machines (called Pascal's calculators and later Pascalines), establishing him as one of the first two inventors of the mechanical calculator.

He also worked in the natural and applied sciences, where he made important contributions to the study of fluids, and clarified the concepts of pressure and vacuum by generalising the work of Evangelista Torricelli. Following Galileo Galilei and Torricelli, in 1647, he rebutted Aristotle's followers who insisted that nature abhors a vacuum. Pascal's results caused many disputes before being accepted. Pascal also wrote in defense of the scientific method.

In 1646, he and his sister Jacqueline identified with the religious movement within Catholicism known by its detractors as Jansenism. Following a religious experience in late 1654, he began writing influential works on philosophy and theology. His two most famous works date from this period: the Lettres provinciales and the Pensées, the former set in the conflict between Jansenists and Jesuits. The latter contains Pascal's Wager, known in the original as the Discourse on the Machine, a probabilistic argument for God's existence. In that year, he also wrote an important treatise on the arithmetical triangle. Between 1658 and 1659, he wrote on the cycloid and its use in calculating the volume of solids.

Throughout his life, Pascal was in frail health, especially after the age of 18; he died just two months after his 39th birthday.

photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Beauty is a harmonious relation between something in our nature and the quality of the object which delights us.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

It is impossible on reasonable grounds to disbelieve miracles.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Those who do not hate their own selfishness and regard themselves as more important than the rest of the world are blind because the truth lies elsewhere.

--Blaise Pascal
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Contradiction is a bad sign of truth; several things which are certain are contradicted; several things which are false pass without contradiction. Contradiction is not a sign of falsity, nor the want of contradiction a sign of truth.

--Blaise Pascal
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Put the world's greatest philosopher on a plank that is wider than need be; if there is a precipe below, although his reason may convince him that he is safe, his imagination will prevail.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

If you would have people speak well of you, then do not speak well of yourself.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

There is a certain standard of grace and beauty which consists in a certain relation between our nature and the thing which pleases us.

--Blaise Pascal

Longer Version:

There is a certain standard of grace and beauty which consists in a certain relation between our nature, such as it is, weak or strong, and the thing which pleases us. Whatever is formed according to this standard pleases us, be it house, song, discourse, verse, prose, woman, birds, rivers, trees, room, dress, and so on. Whatever is not made according to this standard displeases those who have good taste.


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Distraction is the only thing that consoles us for miseries and yet it is itself the greatest of our miseries.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Opinion is the queen of the world.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Do you wish men to speak well of you? Then never speak well of yourself.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

The sensibility of man to trifles, and his insensibility to great things, indicates a strange inversion.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Our notion of symmetry is derived from the human face. Hence, we demand symmetry horizontally and in breath only, not vertically nor in depth.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

The arithmetical machine produces effects that approach nearer to thought than all the actions of animals. But it does nothing that would enable us to attribute will to it, as to the animals.

--Blaise Pascal
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We never do evil so effectually as when we are led to do it by a false principle of conscience.

--Blaise Pascal
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Those honor nature well, who teach that she can speak on everything.

--Blaise Pascal

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The married should not forget that to speak of love begets love.

--Blaise Pascal


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Man's condition. Inconstancy, boredom, anxiety. (Page 1).

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Justice is as much a matter of fashion as charm is.

--Blaise Pascal
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Perfect clarity would profit the intellect but damage the will.

--Blaise Pascal
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Description of man: dependence, longing for independence, need.

--Blaise Pascal
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Brave deeds are wasted when hidden.

--Blaise Pascal
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Continuity in everything is unpleasant.

--Blaise Pascal
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There is enough light for those who only desire to see, and enough obscurity for those who have a contrary disposition.

--Blaise Pascal
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It is the contest that delights us, and not the victory.

--Blaise Pascal
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If we regulate our conduct according to our own convictions, we may safely disregard the praise or censure of others.

--Blaise Pascal
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A mere trifle consoles us, for a mere trifle distresses us.

--Blaise Pascal
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Continued eloquence is wearisome.

--Blaise Pascal
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It is superstitious to put one's hopes in formalities, but arrogant to refuse to submit to them.

--Blaise Pascal
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Nothing is so important to man as his own state; nothing is so formidable to him as eternity. And thus it is unnatural that thereshould be men indifferent to the loss of their existence and to the perils of everlasting suffering.

--Blaise Pascal
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God only pours out his light into the mind after having subdued the rebellion of the will by an altogether heavenly gentleness which charms and wins it.

--Blaise Pascal
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Happiness can be found neither in ourselves nor in external things, but in God and in ourselves as united to him.

--Blaise Pascal

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The self is hateful.

--Blaise Pascal
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Good deeds, when concealed, are the most admirable.

--Blaise Pascal

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Jesus was in a garden, not of delight as the first Adam, in which he destroyed himself and the whole human race, but in one of agony, in which he saved himself and the whole human race.

--Blaise Pascal
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No man ever believes with a true and saving faith unless God inclines his heart; and no man when God does incline his heart can refrain from believing.

--Blaise Pascal
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The more intelligence one has, the more people one finds original. Commonplace people see no difference between men.

--Blaise Pascal
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Muhammad established a religion by putting his enemies to death; Jesus Christ by commanding his followers to lay down their lives.

--Blaise Pascal
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One must know oneself. If this does not serve to discover truth, it at least serves as a rule of life, and there is nothing better.

--Blaise Pascal
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I made this letter very long, because I did not have the leisure to make it shorter.

--Blaise Pascal

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What a Chimera is man! What a novelty, a monster, a chaos, a contradiction, a prodigy! Judge of all things, an imbecile worm; depository of truth, and sewer of error and doubt; the glory and refuse of the universe.

--Blaise Pascal
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Which is the more believable of the two, Moses or China?

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

The statements of atheists ought to be perfectly clear of doubt. Now it is not perfectly clear that the soul is material.

--Blaise Pascal

photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

It is not only old and early impressions that deceive us; the charms of novelty have the same power.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

To go beyond the bounds of moderation is to outrage humanity.

--Blaise Pascal

Longer Version:

To go beyond the bounds of moderation is to outrage humanity. The greatness of the human soul is shown by knowing how to keep within proper bounds. There are two equally dangerous extremes- to shut reason out, and not to let nothing in.


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People are generally better persuaded by the reasons which they have themselves discovered than by those which have come into the mind of others.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

We are so presumptuous that we should like to be known all over the world, even by people who will only come when we are no more. Such is our vanity that the good opinion of half a dozen of the people around us gives us pleasure and satisfaction.

--Blaise Pascal

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The stream is always purer at its source.

--Blaise Pascal

Longer Version:

The stream is always purer at its source.

Fr., Les choses valent toujours mieux dans leur source.



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To ridicule philosophy is really to philosophize.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

To make a man a saint, it must indeed be by grace; and whoever doubts this does not know what a saint is, or a man.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

All the good maxims which are in the world fail when applied to one's self.

--Blaise Pascal

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Miracle does not always signify miracle.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Men are so completely fools by necessity that he is but a fool in a higher strain of folly who does not confess his foolishness.

--Blaise Pascal

photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Symmetry is what we see at a glance; based on the fact that there is no reason for any difference.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

A little thing comforts us because a little thing afflicts us.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

The whole title by which you possess your property, is not a title of nature but of a human institution.

--Blaise Pascal
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Vanity is so secure in the heart of man that everyone wants to be admired: even I who write this, and you who read this.

--Blaise Pascal
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The Christian religion teaches me two points-that there is a God whom men can know, and that their nature is so corrupt that they are unworthy of Him.

--Blaise Pascal


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Amusement that is excessive and followed only for its own sake, allures and deceives us.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Is it courage in a dying man to go, in weakness and in agony, to affront an almighty and eternal God?

--Blaise Pascal

photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Religion is so great a thing that it is right that those who will not take the trouble to seek it if it be obscure, should be deprived of it.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Our own interests are still an exquisite means for dazzling our eyes agreeably.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Imagination is the deceptive part in man, the mistress of error and falsehood.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

Montaigne is wrong in declaring that custom ought to be followed simply because it is custom, and not because it is reasonable or just.

--Blaise Pascal
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The principles of pleasure are not firm and stable. They are different in all mankind, and variable in every particular with such a diversity that there is no man more different from
another than from himself at different times.

--Blaise Pascal
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The imagination enlarges little objects so as to fill our souls with a fantastic estimate; and, with rash insolence, it belittles the great to its own measure, as when talking of God.

--Blaise Pascal
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Why God has instituted Prayer:-- To communicate to his creatures the dignity of causation.

--Blaise Pascal
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Nothing is more dastardly than to act with bravado toward God.

--Blaise Pascal

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It is not permitted to the most equitable of men to be a judge in his own cause.

--Blaise Pascal



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Nature imitates herself. A grain thrown into good ground brings forth fruit; a principle thrown into a good mind brings forth fruit. Everything is created and conducted by the same Master-the root, the branch, the fruits-the principles, the consequences.

--Blaise Pascal

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There are plenty of maxims in the world; all that remains is to apply them.

--Blaise Pascal



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Anyone who found the secret of rejoicing when things go well without being annoyed when they go badly would have found the point.

--Blaise Pascal
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If it is an extraordinary blindness to live without investigating what we are, it is a terrible one to live an evil life, while believing in God.

--Blaise Pascal
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The captain of a ship is not chosen from those of the passengers who comes from the best family.

--Blaise Pascal
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Apart from Jesus Christ, we do not know what is our life, nor our death, nor God, nor ourselves.

--Blaise Pascal
photo of author Blaise Pascal with quote

When a man who accepts the Christian doctrine lives unworthily of it, it is much clearer to say he is a bad Christian than to say he is not a Christian.

--Blaise Pascal
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If he exalts himself, I humble him. If he humbles himself, I exalt him. And I go on contradicting him Until he understands That he is a monster that passes all understanding.

--Blaise Pascal
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One of the greatest artifices the devil uses to engage men in vice and debauchery, is to fasten names of contempt on certain virtues, and thus fill weak souls with a foolish fear of passing for scrupulous, should they desire to put them in practice.

--Blaise Pascal
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Knowing God without knowing our wretchedness leads to pride. Knowing our wretchedness without knowing God leads to despair. Knowing Jesus Christ is the middle course, because in him we find both God and our wretchedness.

--Blaise Pascal

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