Title Image - Quotes by Author Harriet Tubman

Welcome to our collection of quotes (with shareable picture quotes) by Harriet Tubman. We hope you enjoy pondering them and that you will share them widely.

Wikipedia Summary for Harriet Tubman

Harriet Tubman (born Araminta Ross, c. March 1822 – March 10, 1913) was an American abolitionist and political activist. Born into slavery, Tubman escaped and subsequently made some 13 missions to rescue approximately 70 enslaved people, including family and friends, using the network of antislavery activists and safe houses known as the Underground Railroad. During the American Civil War, she served as an armed scout and spy for the Union Army. In her later years, Tubman was an activist in the movement for women's suffrage.

Born enslaved in Dorchester County, Maryland, Tubman was beaten and whipped by her various masters as a child. Early in life, she suffered a traumatic head wound when an irate overseer threw a heavy metal weight intending to hit another enslaved person, but hit her instead. The injury caused dizziness, pain, and spells of hypersomnia, which occurred throughout her life. After her injury, Tubman began experiencing strange visions and vivid dreams, which she ascribed to premonitions from God. These experiences, combined with her Methodist upbringing, led her to become devoutly religious.

In 1849, Tubman escaped to Philadelphia, only to return to Maryland to rescue her family soon after. Slowly, one group at a time, she brought relatives with her out of the state, and eventually guided dozens of other enslaved people to freedom. Traveling by night and in extreme secrecy, Tubman (or "Moses", as she was called) "never lost a passenger". After the Fugitive Slave Act of 1850 was passed, she helped guide fugitives farther north into British North America (Canada), and helped newly freed enslaved people find work. Tubman met John Brown in 1858, and helped him plan and recruit supporters for his 1859 raid on Harpers Ferry.

When the Civil War began, Tubman worked for the Union Army, first as a cook and nurse, and then as an armed scout and spy. The first woman to lead an armed expedition in the war, she guided the raid at Combahee Ferry, which liberated more than 700 enslaved people. After the war, she retired to the family home on property she had purchased in 1859 in Auburn, New York, where she cared for her aging parents. She was active in the women's suffrage movement until illness overtook her, and she had to be admitted to a home for elderly African Americans that she had helped to establish years earlier. After her death in 1913, she became an icon of courage and freedom.

Twant me, 'twas the Lord. I always told him, 'I trust to you. I don't know where to go or what to do, but I expect you to lead me,' and He always did.

--Harriet Tubman

There was one of two things I had a right to: liberty or death. If I could not have one, I would take the other, for no man should take me alive. I should fight for liberty as long as my strength lasted.

--Harriet Tubman

Marcus Garvey had in their times. We just had a more vulnerable enemy.

--Harriet Tubman

I was the most famous conductor on the Underground Railroad.

--Harriet Tubman

I would have been able to free a thousand more slaves if I could only have convinced them that they were slaves.

--Harriet Tubman

I grew up like a neglected weed -- ignorant of liberty, having no experience of it.

--Harriet Tubman

I am at peace with God and all mankind.

--Harriet Tubman

The Lord who told me to take care of my people meant me to do it just as long as I live, and so I did what he told me.

--Harriet Tubman

I freed thousands of slaves, and could have freed thousands more, if they had known they were slaves.

--Harriet Tubman

Why, der language down dar in de far South is jus' as different from ours in Maryland, as you can think. Dey laughed when dey heard me talk, an' I could not understand 'dem, no how.

--Harriet Tubman

Slavery is the next thing to hell.

--Harriet Tubman

I never ran my train off the track, and I never lost a passenger.

--Harriet Tubman

I had two sisters carried away in a chain-gang -- one of them left two children. We were always uneasy.

--Harriet Tubman

As I lay so sick on my bed, from Christmas till March, I was always praying for poor ole master. 'Pears like I didn't do nothing but pray for ole master. 'Oh, Lord, convert ole master;' 'Oh, dear Lord, change dat man's heart, and make him a Christian.'

--Harriet Tubman

I think there's many a slaveholder'll get to Heaven. They don't know better. They acts up to the light they have.

--Harriet Tubman

I think slavery is the next thing to hell. If a person would send another into bondage, he would, it appears to me, be bad enough to send him into hell if he could.

--Harriet Tubman

I said to de Lord, 'I'm goin' to hold steady on to you, an' I know you'll see me through.'

--Harriet Tubman

Never wound a snake; kill it.

--Harriet Tubman

I've heard 'Uncle Tom's Cabin' read, and I tell you Mrs. Stowe's pen hasn't begun to paint what slavery is as I have seen it at the far South. I've seen de real thing, and I don't want to see it on no stage or in no theater.

--Harriet Tubman

I had reasoned this out in my mind, there was one of two things I had a right to, liberty or death; if I could not have one, I would have the other.

--Harriet Tubman

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