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Wikipedia Summary for James Joyce

James Augustine Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, poet and literary critic. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde movement and is regarded as one of the most influential and important writers of the 20th century. Joyce's novel Ulysses (1922) is a landmark in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey are paralleled in a variety of literary styles, most famously stream of consciousness. Other well-known works are the short-story collection Dubliners (1914) and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man (1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939). His other writings include three books of poetry, a play, letters and occasional journalism.

Joyce was born in Dublin into a middle-class family. A brilliant student, he attended the Jesuit Clongowes Wood College in County Kildare, then, briefly, the Christian Brothers-run O'Connell School. Despite the chaotic family life imposed by his father's unpredictable finances, he excelled at the Jesuit Belvedere College and graduated at University College in Dublin in 1902. In 1904, he met his future wife Nora Barnacle and they moved to mainland Europe. He briefly worked in Pola and then moved to Trieste in Austria-Hungary, working as an English instructor. Except for an eight-month stay in Rome working as a correspondence clerk and three visits to Dublin, Joyce resided there until 1915. In Trieste, he published his book of poems Chamber Music and his short story collection Dubliners, and he began serially publishing The Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man in the English magazine The Egoist. During most of World War I, Joyce lived in Zürich, Switzerland and worked on Ulysses. After the war, he briefly returned to Trieste and then moved to Paris in 1920, which became his primary residence until 1940.

Ulysses was first published in Paris in 1922, but its publication in England and the United States was prohibited because of its perceived obscenity. Copies were smuggled into both countries and pirated versions were printed until the mid-1930s, when publication finally became legal. Joyce started his next major work, Finnegans Wake, in 1923, publishing it sixteen years later in 1939. Between these years, Joyce travelled widely. He and Nora were married in a civil ceremony in London in 1930. He made a number of trips to Switzerland, frequently seeking treatment for his increasingly severe eye problems and psychological help for his daughter, Lucia. When France was occupied by Germany during World War II, Joyce moved back to Zürich in 1940. He died there in 1941 after surgery for a perforated ulcer, less than one month before his 59th birthday.

Ulysses ranks high in lists of great books of literature, and the academic literature analysing his work is extensive and ongoing. Many writers, film-makers and other artists have been influenced by his stylistic innovations, such as his meticulous attention to detail, use of interior monologue, wordplay, and the radical transformation of traditional plot and character development. Though most of his adult life was spent abroad, his fictional universe centres on Dublin and is largely populated by characters who closely resemble family members, enemies and friends from his time there. Ulysses in particular is set in the streets and alleyways of the city. Joyce is quoted as saying, "For myself, I always write about Dublin, because if I can get to the heart of Dublin I can get to the heart of all the cities of the world. In the particular is contained the universal."

Your mind will give back to you exactly what you put into it.

--James Joyce

Love...is in fact so unnatural a phenomenon that it can scarcely repeat itself.

--James Joyce

By an epiphany he meant a sudden spiritual manifestation, whether in vulgarity of speech or of gesture or in a memorable phase of the mind itself.

--James Joyce

Art is the human disposition of sensible or intelligible matter for an aesthetic end.

--James Joyce

Do you know what Ireland is? Ireland is the old sow that eats her farrow.

--James Joyce

Resignation is the timid sign of courage.

--James Joyce

This race and this country and this life produced me, he said. I shall express myself as I am.

--James Joyce

As you are now so once were we.

--James Joyce

Secrets, silent, stony sit in the dark palaces of both our hearts secrets weary of their tyranny, tyrants willing to be dethroned.

--James Joyce

What? Corpus. Body. Corpse. Good idea the Latin. Stupefies them first. Hospice for the dying. They don't seem to chew it; only swallow it down.

--James Joyce

Bury the dead. Say Robinson Crusoe was true to life. Well, then Friday buried him. Every Friday buries a Thursday if you come to look at it.

--James Joyce

Why is it that words like these seem dull and cold? Is it because there is no word tender enough to be your name?

--James Joyce

Can't bring back time. Like holding water in your hand.

--James Joyce

Time is, time was, but time shall be no more.

--James Joyce

Never know whose thoughts you're chewing.

--James Joyce

When I makes tea I makes tea, as old mother Grogan said. And when I makes water I makes water.

--James Joyce

Pity is the feeling which arrests the mind in the presence of whatsoever is grave and constant in human sufferings and unites it with the human sufferer.

--James Joyce

Ask no questions and you'll hear no lies.

--James Joyce

Love (understood as the desire of good for another) is in fact so unnatural a phenomenon that it can scarcely repeat itself, the soul being unable to become virgin again and not having energy enough to cast itself out again into the ocean of another's soul.

--James Joyce

Every life is many days, day after day. We walk through ourselves, meeting robbers, ghosts, giants, old men, young men, wives, widows, brothers-in-love. But always meeting ourselves.

--James Joyce

But all they are all there scraping along to sneeze out a likelihood that will solve and salve life's robulous rebus.

--James Joyce

First kiss does the trick. The propitious moment. Something inside them goes pop.

--James Joyce

Hell is the centre of evils and, as you know, things are more intense at their centres than at their remotest points.

--James Joyce

A man of genius makes no mistakes. His errors are volitional and are the portals of discovery.

--James Joyce

Rather upsets a man's day a funeral does.

--James Joyce

O, dread and dire word. Eternity! What mind of man can understand it?

--James Joyce

Desire's wind blasts the thorntree but after it becomes from a bramblebush to be a rose upon the rood of time.

--James Joyce

Funerals all over the world everywhere every minute. Shovelling them under by the cartload doublequick. Thousands every hour. Too many in the world.

--James Joyce

The artist, like the God of creation, remains within or behind or beyond or above his handiwork, invisible, refined out of existence, indifferent, paring his fingernails.

--James Joyce


No one wanted him; he was outcast from life's feast.

--James Joyce

What dreams would he have, not seeing. Life a dream for him. Where is the justice being born that way?

--James Joyce

A darkness shining in brightness which brightness could not comprehend.

--James Joyce

We are all born in the same way but we all die in different ways.

--James Joyce

Never back a woman you defend, never get quit of a friend on whom you depend, never make face to a foe till he's rife and never get stuck to another man's pfife.

--James Joyce

The State is concentric, but the individual is eccentric.

--James Joyce

Drugs age you after mental excitement. Lethargy then. Why? Reaction. A lifetime in a night. Gradually changes your character.

--James Joyce

Look at the woebegone walk of him. Eaten a bad egg. Poached eyes on ghost.

--James Joyce

Dust webbed the window and the showtrays. Dust darkened the toiling fingers with their vulture nails. Dust slept on dull coils of bronze and silver, lozenges of cinnabar, on rubies, leprous and winedark stones.

--James Joyce

I think I would know Nora's fart anywhere. I think I could pick hers out in a roomful of farting women.

--James Joyce

YesIsaidyesyesyesyesyes...YesIsaidyes! andagainyesyesyes -- Molly Bloom.

--James Joyce

Thought is the thought of thought. Tranquil brightness. The soul is in a manner all that is: the soul is the form of forms. Tranquillity sudden, vast, candescent: form of forms.

--James Joyce

I have left my book, I have left my room, For I heard you singing Through the gloom.

--James Joyce

Every age must look for its sanction to its poetry and philosophy, for in these the human mind, as it looks backward or forward, attains to an eternal state.

--James Joyce

Beware the horns of a bull, the heels of the horse, and the smile of an Englishman.

--James Joyce

What incensed him the most was the blatant jokes of the ones that passed it all off as a jest, pretending to understand everything and in reality not knowing their own minds.

--James Joyce

I will not say nothing. I will defend my church and my religion when it is insulted and spit on.

--James Joyce

There is not past, no future; everything flows in an eternal present.

--James Joyce

We have the liberal arts and we have the useful arts.

--James Joyce

What kind of liberation would that be to forsake an absurdity which is logical and coherent and to embrace one which is illogical and incoherent?

--James Joyce

Don't you think there is a certain resemblance between the mystery of the Mass and what I am trying to do?...To give people some kind of intellectual pleasure or spiritual enjoyment by converting the bread of everyday life into something that has a permanent artistic life of its own.

--James Joyce

Time's ruins build eternity's mansions.

--James Joyce

Here's lumbos. Where misties swaddlum, where misches lodge none, where mystries pour kind on, O sleepy! So be yet!

--James Joyce

Any object, intensely regarded, may be a gate of access to the incorruptible eon of the gods.

--James Joyce

But Noodynaady's actual ingrate tootle is of come into the garner mauve and thy nice are stores of morning and buy me a bunch of iodines.

--James Joyce

Poppypap's a passport out.

--James Joyce

Civilization may be said indeed to be the creation of its outlaws.

--James Joyce

The pleasures of love lasts but a fleeting but the pledges of life outlusts a lieftime.

--James Joyce

She was well primed with a good load of Delahunt's port under her bellyband.

--James Joyce

My puns are not trivial. They are quadrivial.

--James Joyce

What's yours is mine and what's mine is my own.

--James Joyce

Bite my laughters, drink my tears. Pore into me, volumes, spell me stark and spill me swooning, I just don't care what my thwarters think.

--James Joyce

I am proud to be an emotionalist.

--James Joyce

To remember that and the white look of the lavatory made him feel cold and then hot. There were two cocks that you turned and water came out: cold and hot. He felt cold and then a little hot: and he could see the names printed on the cocks. That was a very queer thing.

--James Joyce

Death, a cause of terror to the sinner, is a blessed moment for him who has walked in the right path.

--James Joyce

I am quite content to go down to posterity as a scissors and paste man for that seems to me a harsh but not unjust description.

--James Joyce

Satan, really, is the romantic youth of Jesus re-appearing for a moment.

--James Joyce

Sentimentality is unearned emotion.

--James Joyce

People could put up with being bitten by a wolf but what properly riled them was a bite from a sheep.

--James Joyce

Life, he himself once said.. is a wake, livit or krikit, and on the bunk of our bread-winning lies the cropse of our seedfather, a phrase which the establisher of the world by law might pretinately write across the chestfront of all manorwombanborn.

--James Joyce

There is only one thing that makes any one athlete better than another, his heart. We all put our underwear on feet first, so we are all human.

--James Joyce

In woman's womb word is made flesh but in the spirit of the maker all flesh that passes becomes the word that shall not pass away. This is the postcreation.

--James Joyce

He wanted to cry quietly but not for himself: for the words, so beautiful and sad, like music.

--James Joyce

The important thing is not what we write but how we write, and in my opinion the modern writer must be an adventurer above all, willing to take every risk, and be prepared to founder in his effort if need be. In other words we must write dangerously.

--James Joyce

Gerty Mc Dowell'a kur yapıp kalbini kazanacak olan adamın tam bir erkek olması gerekiyordu. Ama bekliyordu, h l birinin ona teklif etmesini bekliyordu, ayrıca bu yıl artık yıldı ve yakında bitecekti.
S.339.

--James Joyce

Riverrun, past Eve and Adam's, from swerve of shore to bend of bay, brings us by a commodius vicus of recirculation back to Howth Castle and Environs.

--James Joyce

We are bound together by the sympathy of our antipathies.

--James Joyce

Let people get fond of each other: lure them on. Then tear asunder.

--James Joyce

Oblige me by taking away that knife. I can't look at the point of it. It reminds me of Roman history.

--James Joyce

Very gratefully, with grateful appreciation, with sincere appreciative gratitude, in appreciatively grateful sincerity of regret, he declined.

--James Joyce

It seems to me you do not care what banality a man expresses so long as he expresses it in Irish.

--James Joyce

To say that a great genius is mad, while at the same time recognizing his artistic merit, is no better than to say he is rheumatic or diabetic.

--James Joyce

I'll tickle his catastrophe.

--James Joyce

You get a decent do at the Brazen Head.

--James Joyce

Our souls, shame-wounded by our sins, cling to us yet more, a woman to her lover clinging, the more the more.

--James Joyce

The voices blend and fuse in clouded silence: silence that is infinite of space: and swiftly, silently the sound is wafted over regions of cycles of cycles of generations that have lived.

--James Joyce

Man and woman, love, what is it? A cork and a bottle.

--James Joyce

His heart danced upon her movement like a cork upon a tide.

--James Joyce

It is a symbol of Irish art. The cracked looking-glass of a servant.

--James Joyce

Gazing up into the darkness I saw myself as a creature driven and derided by vanity; and my eyes burned with anguish and anger.

--James Joyce

Wipe your glosses with what you know.

--James Joyce

I should tell you that honestly, on my honour of a Nearwicked, I always think in a wordworth's of that primed favourite continental poet, Daunty, Gouty and Shopkeeper, A.G., whom the generality admoyers in this that is and that this is to come.

--James Joyce

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