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Welcome to our collection of quotes (with shareable picture quotes) by Jane Austen. We hope you enjoy pondering them and that you will share them widely.

Wikipedia Summary for Jane Austen

Jane Austen (16 December 1775 – 18 July 1817) was an English novelist known primarily for her six major novels, which interpret, critique and comment upon the British landed gentry at the end of the 18th century. Austen's plots often explore the dependence of women on marriage in the pursuit of favourable social standing and economic security. Her works critique the novels of sensibility of the second half of the 18th century and are part of the transition to 19th-century literary realism. Her use of biting irony, along with her realism, humour, and social commentary, have long earned her acclaim among critics, scholars, and popular audiences alike.

With the publication of Sense and Sensibility (1811), Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma (1816), she achieved success as a published writer. She wrote two other novels, Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, both published posthumously in 1818, and began another, eventually titled Sanditon, but died before its completion. She also left behind three volumes of juvenile writings in manuscript, the short epistolary novel Lady Susan, and another unfinished novel, The Watsons. Her six full-length novels have rarely been out of print, although they were published anonymously and brought her moderate success and little fame during her lifetime.

A significant transition in her posthumous reputation occurred in 1833, when her novels were republished in Richard Bentley's Standard Novels series, illustrated by Ferdinand Pickering, and sold as a set. They gradually gained wider acclaim and popular readership. In 1869, fifty-two years after her death, her nephew's publication of A Memoir of Jane Austen introduced a compelling version of her writing career and supposedly uneventful life to an eager audience.

Austen has inspired many critical essays and literary anthologies. Her novels have inspired many films, from 1940's Pride and Prejudice to more recent productions like Sense and Sensibility (1995), Emma (1996), Mansfield Park (1999), Pride & Prejudice (2005), Love & Friendship (2016), and Emma (2020).

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At my time of life opinions are tolerably fixed. It is not likely that I should now see or hear any thing to change them.

--Jane Austen



photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Where other powers of entertainment are wanting, the true philosopher will derive benefit from such as are given.

--Jane Austen
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A woman never looks better than on horseback.

--Jane Austen
photo of author Jane Austen with quote

But angry people are not always wise.

--Jane Austen
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If there is any thing disagreeable going on, men are always sure to get out of it.

--Jane Austen
photo of author Jane Austen with quote

One cannot have too large a party. A large party secures its own amusement.

--Jane Austen
photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Children of the same family; the same blood; with the same first associations and habits; have some means of enjoyment in their power; which no subsequent connections can supply.

--Jane Austen
photo of author Jane Austen with quote

We do not look in our great cities for our best moralit.

--Jane Austen

Longer Version:

We do not look in our great cities for our best morality.


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Friendship is really the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love.

--Jane Austen
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I do not want people to be agreeable, as it saves me that trouble of liking them.

--Jane Austen
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A scheme of which every part promises delight, can never be successful; and general disappointment is only warded off by the defense of some little peculiar vexation.

--Jane Austen

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I am no longer surprised at your knowing only six accomplished women. I rather wonder now at your knowing any.

--Jane Austen
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With such a worshipping wife, it was hardly possible that any natural defects in it should not be increased. The extreme sweetness of her temper must hurt his.

--Jane Austen
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It has been coming on so gradually, that I hardly know when it began. But I believe I must date it from my first seeing his beautiful grounds at Pemberley.

--Jane Austen
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Whatever bears affinity to cunning is despicable.

--Jane Austen
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It is singularity which often makes the worst part of our suffering, as it always does of our conduct.

--Jane Austen
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I think him every thing that is worthy and amiable.

--Jane Austen
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I am all astonishment.

--Jane Austen
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Run mad as often as you choose but do not faint.

--Jane Austen
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It's a truth universally acknowledged.

--Jane Austen

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The wisest and the best of men, nay, the wisest and best of their actions, may be rendered ridiculous by a person whose first object in life is a joke.

--Jane Austen
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But to appear happy when I am so miserable -- Oh! who can require it?

--Jane Austen
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Catherine had never wanted comfort more, and Henry looked as if he was aware of it.

--Jane Austen


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Give me but a little cheerful company, let me only have the company of the people I love, let me only be where I like and with whom I like, and the devil may take the rest, say I.

--Jane Austen
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Pray, my dear aunt, what is the difference in matrimonial affairs, between the mercenary and the prudent motive? Where does discretion end, and avarice begin?

--Jane Austen
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But I hate to hear you talking so like a fine gentleman, and as if women were all fine ladies, instead of rational creatures. We none of us expect to be in smooth water all our days.

--Jane Austen
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For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbors, and laugh at them in our turn?

--Jane Austen
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She denied none of it aloud, and agreed to none of it in private.

--Jane Austen
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Fine dancing, I believe like virtue, must be its own reward. Those who are standing by are usually thinking of something very different.

--Jane Austen
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Emma had no opportunity of speaking to Mr. Knightley till after supper; but, when they were all in the ballroom again, her eyes invited him irresistibly to come to her and be thanked.

--Jane Austen
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Here are officers enough in Meryton to disappoint all the young ladies in the country.

--Jane Austen
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To her own heart it was a delightful affair, to her imagination it was even a ridiculous one, but to her reason, her judgment, it was completely a puzzle.

--Jane Austen
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I come here with no expectations, only to profess, now that I am at liberty to do so, that my heart is and always will be...yours.

--Jane Austen
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I should wish to see them very good friends, and would, on no account, authorize in my girls the smallest degree of arrogance towards their relations; but still they cannot be equals.

--Jane Austen
photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I am worn out with civility.

--Jane Austen

Longer Version:

I am worn out with civility. I have been talking incessantly all night, and with nothing to say. But with you there may be peace. You will not want to be talked to. Let us have the luxury of silence.


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You have gained a new source of enjoyment, and it is well to have as many holds upon happiness as possible.

--Jane Austen
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I am certainly the most fortunate creature that ever existed!

--Jane Austen
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Where the wound had been given, there must the cure be found, if any where.

--Jane Austen
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His departure gave Catherine the first experimental conviction that a loss may be sometimes a gain.

--Jane Austen
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Man only can be aware of the insensibility of man towards a new gown.

--Jane Austen
photo of author Jane Austen with quote

The past, present, and future, were all equally in gloom.

--Jane Austen
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It sometimes is a disadvantage to be so very guarded. If a woman conceals her affection from the object of it, she may loose the opportunity of fixing him.

--Jane Austen
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You want nothing, but patience or give it a more fascinating name. Call it hope.

--Jane Austen
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I am going to take a heroine whom no one but myself will much like.

--Jane Austen
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There was a great deal of good sense in all this; but there are some situations of the human mind in which good sense has very little power.

--Jane Austen
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General benevolence, but not general friendship, make a man what he ought to be.

--Jane Austen
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Every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason.

--Jane Austen

Longer Version:

Every impulse of feeling should be guided by reason; and, in my opinion, exertion should always be in proportion to what is required.



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Pride has often been his best friend. It has connected him nearer with virtue than any other feeling.

--Jane Austen
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What did she say? Just what she ought, of course. A lady always does.

--Jane Austen
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Oh! Do not attack me with your watch. A watch is always too fast or too slow. I cannot be dictated to by a watch.

--Jane Austen
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She is loveliness itself.

--Jane Austen
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That would be the greatest misfortune of all! -- To find a man agreeable whom one is determined to hate! -- Do not wish me such an evil.

--Jane Austen
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We met Dr. Hall in such deep mourning that either his mother, his wife, or himself must be dead.

--Jane Austen
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No: the years which had destroyed her youth and bloom had only given him a more glowing, manly, open look, in no respect lessening his personal advantages. She had seen the same Frederick Wentworth.

--Jane Austen
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Every body has their taste in noises as well as other matters; and sounds are quite innoxious, or most distressing, by their sort rather than their quantity.

--Jane Austen
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Lady Middleton resigned herself... Contenting herself with merely giving her husband a gentle reprimand on the subject, five or six times every day.

--Jane Austen
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There had been moments when she felt he had almost forgiven her. She would always remember those moments.

--Jane Austen
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You pierce my soul. I am half agony, half hope. Tell me not that I am too late, that such precious feelings are gone for ever.

--Jane Austen
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I wish I might take this for a compliment; but to be so easily seen through I am afraid is pitiful.

--Jane Austen
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The post office has a great charm at one point of our lives. When you have lived to my age, you will begin to think letters are never worth going through the rain for.

--Jane Austen
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It was absolutely necessary to interrupt him now.

--Jane Austen
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You shall not, for the sake
of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity.

--Jane Austen
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It is very difficult for the prosperous to be humble.

--Jane Austen
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And you are never to stir out of doors till you can prove that you have spent ten minutes of every day in a rational manner.

--Jane Austen
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With men he can be rational and unaffected, but when he has ladies to please, every feature works.

--Jane Austen
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Ah! There is nothing like staying at home, for real comfort.

--Jane Austen
photo of author Jane Austen with quote

You shall not, for the sake of one individual, change the meaning of principle and integrity.

--Jane Austen
photo of author Jane Austen with quote

You have delighted us long enough.

--Jane Austen
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She knew that when she played she was giving pleasure only to herself; but this was no new sensation.

--Jane Austen
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She was nothing more than a mere good-tempered, civil and obliging Young Woman; as such we could scarcely dislike her -- she was only an Object of Contempt.

--Jane Austen
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Marianne was silent; it was impossible for her to say what she did not feel, however trivial the occasion.

--Jane Austen
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Shyness is only the effect of a sense of inferiority in some way or other. If I could persuade myself that my manner were perfectly easy and graceful, I should not be shy.

--Jane Austen
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She had spoken it; but she trembled when it was done, conscious that her words were listened to, and daring not even to try to observe their effect.

--Jane Austen
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There is no disputing about taste.

--Jane Austen
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I am no indiscriminate novel reader. The mere trash of the common circulating library I hold in the highest contempt.

--Jane Austen
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The bells rang, and everybody smiled.

--Jane Austen
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I have had to contend against the unkindness of his sister, and the insolence of his mother; and have suffered the punishment of an attachment, without enjoying its advantages.

--Jane Austen
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It was a delightful visit;-perfect, in being much too short.

--Jane Austen
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Wickedness is always wickedness, but folly is not always folly.

--Jane Austen
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To take a dislike to a young man, only because he appeared to be of a different disposition from himself, was unworthy the real liberality of mind.

--Jane Austen
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The worst crimes; are the crimes of the heart.

--Jane Austen
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To yield readily -- easily -- to the persuasion of a friend is no merit.... To yield without conviction is no compliment to the understanding of either.

--Jane Austen
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I trust that absolutes have gradations.

--Jane Austen
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I never wish to offend, but I am so foolishly shy, that I often seem negligent, when I am only kept back by my natural awkwardness.

--Jane Austen

Longer Version:

I never wish to offend, but I am so foolishly shy, that I often seem negligent, when I am only kept back by my natural awkwardness."
-Edward Ferrars.


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Undoubtedly ... there is a meanness in all the arts which ladies sometimes condescend to employ for captivation. What bears affinity to cunning is despicable.

--Jane Austen
photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Elinor agreed to it all, for she did not think he deserved the compliment of rational opposition.

--Jane Austen
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Not very good, I am afraid. But now really, do not you think Udolpho the nicest book in the world? The nicest--by which I suppose you mean the neatest. That must depend upon the binding.

--Jane Austen
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A person who is knowingly bent on bad behavior, gets upset when better behavior is expected of them.

--Jane Austen
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My idea of good company, Mr. Eliot, is the company of clever, well-informed people who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.

--Jane Austen
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But she sat down, resolving within herself to draw no limits in future to the impudence of an impudent man.

--Jane Austen

photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It's been many years since I had such an exemplary vegetable.

--Jane Austen

We wish you a perfect day!