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Quotes by Jane Austen (Page 2 of 3)

Quote: Yes, replied Darcy, who could contain himself no longer, but that was when I first knew her; for it is many months since I have considered her as one of the handsomest women of my acquaintance. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Yes, replied Darcy, who could contain himself no longer, but that was when I first knew her; for it is many months since I have considered her as one of the handsomest women of my acquaintance.


Quote: There are few people whom I really love and still fewer of whom I think well. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

There are few people whom I really love and still fewer of whom I think well.


Quote: You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner.

Longer Version/[Notes]:

You are mistaken, Mr. Darcy, if you suppose that the mode of your declaration affected me in any other way, than as it spared the concern which I might have felt in refusing you, had you behaved in a more gentlemanlike manner." (Elizabeth Bennett).


Quote: Till this moment I never knew myself. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Till this moment I never knew myself.


Quote: You may only call me Mrs. Darcy... when you are completely, and perfectly, and incandescently happy. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

You may only call me Mrs. Darcy... when you are completely, and perfectly, and incandescently happy.


Quote: One cannot fix one's eyes on the commonest natural production without finding food for a rambling fancy. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

One cannot fix one's eyes on the commonest natural production without finding food for a rambling fancy.


Quote: But a sanguine temper, though for ever expecting more good than occurs, does not always pay for its hopes by any proportionate depression. it soon flies over the present failure, and begins to hope again. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

But a sanguine temper, though for ever expecting more good than occurs, does not always pay for its hopes by any proportionate depression. it soon flies over the present failure, and begins to hope again.


Quote: An annuity is a very serious business. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

An annuity is a very serious business.


Quote: A single woman, of good fortune, is always respectable, and may be as sensible and pleasant as any body else. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

A single woman, of good fortune, is always respectable, and may be as sensible and pleasant as any body else.


Quote: A sick child is always the mother's property; her own feelings generally make it so. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

A sick child is always the mother's property; her own feelings generally make it so.


Quote: Everybody's heart is open, you know, when they have recently escaped from severe pain, or are recovering the blessing of health. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Everybody's heart is open, you know, when they have recently escaped from severe pain, or are recovering the blessing of health.


Quote: From politics it was an easy step to silence. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

From politics it was an easy step to silence.


Quote: By the bye, as I must leave off being young, I find many douceurs in being a sort of chaperon , for I am put on the sofa near the fire and can drink as much wine as I like. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

By the bye, as I must leave off being young, I find many douceurs in being a sort of chaperon , for I am put on the sofa near the fire and can drink as much wine as I like.


Quote: It is a shocking trick for a young person to be always lolling upon a sofa. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It is a shocking trick for a young person to be always lolling upon a sofa.


Quote: Now I must give one smirk and then we may be rational again. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Now I must give one smirk and then we may be rational again.


Quote: Goldsmith tells us, that when lovely woman stoops to folly, she has nothing to do but to die; and when she stoops to be disagreeable, it is equally to be recommended as a clearer of ill-fame. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Goldsmith tells us, that when lovely woman stoops to folly, she has nothing to do but to die; and when she stoops to be disagreeable, it is equally to be recommended as a clearer of ill-fame.


Quote: Sitting with her on Sunday evening -- a wet Sunday evening -- the very time of all others when if a friend is at hand the heart must be opened, and every thing told. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Sitting with her on Sunday evening -- a wet Sunday evening -- the very time of all others when if a friend is at hand the heart must be opened, and every thing told.


Quote: Elinor could sit still no longer. She almost ran out of the room, and as soon as the door was closed, burst into tears of joy, which at first she thought would never cease. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Elinor could sit still no longer. She almost ran out of the room, and as soon as the door was closed, burst into tears of joy, which at first she thought would never cease.


Quote: A report of a most alarming nature reached me two days ago. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

A report of a most alarming nature reached me two days ago.


Quote: It is very well worthwhile to be tormented for two or three years of one's life, for the sake of being able to read all the rest of it. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It is very well worthwhile to be tormented for two or three years of one's life, for the sake of being able to read all the rest of it.


Quote: I have changed my mind, and changed the trimmings of my cap this morning; they are now such as you suggested. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I have changed my mind, and changed the trimmings of my cap this morning; they are now such as you suggested.


Quote: They walked on, without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

They walked on, without knowing in what direction. There was too much to be thought, and felt, and said, for attention to any other objects.


Quote: I have not the pleasure of understanding you. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I have not the pleasure of understanding you.


Quote: Loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable; that one false step involves her in endless ruin; that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behaviour towards the undeserving of the other sex. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable; that one false step involves her in endless ruin; that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful; and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behaviour towards the undeserving of the other sex.


Quote: If this man had not twelve thousand a year, he would be a very stupid fellow. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

If this man had not twelve thousand a year, he would be a very stupid fellow.


Quote: Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Had I been in love, I could not have been more wretchedly blind. But vanity, not love, has been my folly.


Quote: Vanity, not love, has been my folly. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Vanity, not love, has been my folly.


Quote: It is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It is better to know as little as possible of the defects of the person with whom you are to pass your life.


Quote: Every young lady may feel for my heroine in this critical moment, for every young lady has at some time or other known the same agitation. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Every young lady may feel for my heroine in this critical moment, for every young lady has at some time or other known the same agitation.


Quote: She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in any thing ridiculous. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

She told the story, however, with great spirit among her friends; for she had a lively, playful disposition, which delighted in any thing ridiculous.


Quote: The little bit (two inches wide) of ivory on which I work with so fine a brush as produces little effect after much labour. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

The little bit (two inches wide) of ivory on which I work with so fine a brush as produces little effect after much labour.


Quote: You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

You showed me how insufficient were all my pretensions to please a woman worthy of being pleased.


Quote: A man who has nothing to do with his own time has no conscience in his intrusion on that of others. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

A man who has nothing to do with his own time has no conscience in his intrusion on that of others.


Quote: Mrs. Jennings was a widow, with an ample jointure. She had only two daughters, both of whom she had lived to see respectably married, and she had now therefore nothing to do but to marry all the rest of the world. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Mrs. Jennings was a widow, with an ample jointure. She had only two daughters, both of whom she had lived to see respectably married, and she had now therefore nothing to do but to marry all the rest of the world.


Quote: Every thing was to take its natural course, however, neither impelled nor assisted. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Every thing was to take its natural course, however, neither impelled nor assisted.


Quote: Ah! what could we do but what we did! We sighed and fainted on the Sofa. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Ah! what could we do but what we did! We sighed and fainted on the Sofa.


Quote: Yes, I found myself, by insensible degrees, sincerely fond of her; and the happiest hours of my life were what I spent with her. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Yes, I found myself, by insensible degrees, sincerely fond of her; and the happiest hours of my life were what I spent with her.


Quote: You have no ambition, I well know. Your wishes are all moderate.' 'As moderate as those of the rest of the world, I believe. I wish as well as every body else to be perfectly happy, but like every body else it must be in my own way. Greatness will not make me so. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

You have no ambition, I well know. Your wishes are all moderate.' 'As moderate as those of the rest of the world, I believe. I wish as well as every body else to be perfectly happy, but like every body else it must be in my own way. Greatness will not make me so.


Quote: But your mind is warped by an innate principle of general integrity, and, therefore, not accessible to the cool reasonings of family partiality, or a desire of revenge. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

But your mind is warped by an innate principle of general integrity, and, therefore, not accessible to the cool reasonings of family partiality, or a desire of revenge.


Quote: There is a quickness of perception in some, a nicety in the discernment of character, a natural penetration, in short, which no experience in others can equal. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

There is a quickness of perception in some, a nicety in the discernment of character, a natural penetration, in short, which no experience in others can equal.


Quote: It would be mortifying to the feelings of many ladies, could they be made to understand how little the heart of a man is affected by what is costly or new in their attire. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It would be mortifying to the feelings of many ladies, could they be made to understand how little the heart of a man is affected by what is costly or new in their attire.


Quote: You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

You want to tell me, and I have no objection to hearing it.


Quote: Mr. Collins is a conceited, pompous, narrow-minded, silly man; you know he is, as well as I do; and you must feel, as well as I do, that the woman who married him cannot have a proper way of thinking. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Mr. Collins is a conceited, pompous, narrow-minded, silly man; you know he is, as well as I do; and you must feel, as well as I do, that the woman who married him cannot have a proper way of thinking.


Quote: On every formal visit a child ought to be of the party, by way of provisions for discourse. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

On every formal visit a child ought to be of the party, by way of provisions for discourse.


Quote: A very short trial convinced her that a curricle was the prettiest equipage in the world. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

A very short trial convinced her that a curricle was the prettiest equipage in the world.


Quote: Unjust I may have been, weak and resentful I have been, but never inconstant. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Unjust I may have been, weak and resentful I have been, but never inconstant.


Quote: To you I shall say, as I have often said before, Do not be in a hurry, the right man will come at last. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

To you I shall say, as I have often said before, Do not be in a hurry, the right man will come at last.


Quote: Why not seize the pleasure at once? -- How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation! by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Why not seize the pleasure at once? -- How often is happiness destroyed by preparation, foolish preparation!


Quote: A single woman with a narrow income must be a ridiculous, disagreeable old maid, the proper sport of boys and girls, but a single woman of fortune is always respectable, and may be as sensible and pleasant as anybody else. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

A single woman with a narrow income must be a ridiculous, disagreeable old maid, the proper sport of boys and girls, but a single woman of fortune is always respectable, and may be as sensible and pleasant as anybody else.


Quote: She hoped to be wise and reasonable in time; but alas! Alas! She must confess to herself that she was not wise yet. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

She hoped to be wise and reasonable in time; but alas! Alas! She must confess to herself that she was not wise yet.


Quote: Real solemn history, I cannot be interested in.... The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Real solemn history, I cannot be interested in.... The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and hardly any women at all.


Quote: I begin already to weigh my words and sentences more than I did, and am looking about for a sentiment, an illustration, or a metaphor in every corner of the room. Could my Ideas flow as fast as the rain in the Storecloset it would be charming. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I begin already to weigh my words and sentences more than I did, and am looking about for a sentiment, an illustration, or a metaphor in every corner of the room. Could my Ideas flow as fast as the rain in the Storecloset it would be charming.


Quote: How little the general report of any one ought to be credited, since no character, however upright, can escape the malevolence of slander. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

How little the general report of any one ought to be credited, since no character, however upright, can escape the malevolence of slander.


Quote: Those who tell their own story you know must be listened to with caution. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Those who tell their own story you know must be listened to with caution.


Quote: The stream is as good as at first; the little rubbish it collects in the turnings is easily moved away. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

The stream is as good as at first; the little rubbish it collects in the turnings is easily moved away.


Quote: She thought it was the misfortune of poetry, to be seldom safely enjoyed by those who enjoyed it completely; and that the strong feelings which alone could estimate it truly, were the very feelings which ought to taste it but sparingly. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

She thought it was the misfortune of poetry, to be seldom safely enjoyed by those who enjoyed it completely; and that the strong feelings which alone could estimate it truly, were the very feelings which ought to taste it but sparingly.


Quote: Without scheming to do wrong, or to make others unhappy, there may be error and there may be misery. Thoughtlessness, want of attention to other people's feelings, and want of resolution, will do the business. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Without scheming to do wrong, or to make others unhappy, there may be error and there may be misery. Thoughtlessness, want of attention to other people's feelings, and want of resolution, will do the business.


Quote: There, he had seen every thing to exalt in his estimation the woman he had lost, and there begun to deplore the pride, the folly, the madness of resentment, which had kept him from trying to regain her when thrown in his way. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

There, he had seen every thing to exalt in his estimation the woman he had lost, and there begun to deplore the pride, the folly, the madness of resentment, which had kept him from trying to regain her when thrown in his way.


Quote: Could there be finer symptoms? Is not general incivility the very essence of love? by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Could there be finer symptoms? Is not general incivility the very essence of love?


Quote: We are each of an unsocial, taciturn disposition, unwilling to speak, unless we expect to say something that will amaze the whole room, and be handed down to posterity with all the eclat of a proverb. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

We are each of an unsocial, taciturn disposition, unwilling to speak, unless we expect to say something that will amaze the whole room, and be handed down to posterity with all the eclat of a proverb.


Quote: Provided that nothing like useful knowledge could be gained from them, provided they were all story and no reflection, she had never any objection to books at all. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Provided that nothing like useful knowledge could be gained from them, provided they were all story and no reflection, she had never any objection to books at all.


Quote: Good-humoured, unaffected girls, will not do for a man who has been used to sensible women. They are two distinct orders of being. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Good-humoured, unaffected girls, will not do for a man who has been used to sensible women. They are two distinct orders of being.


Quote: There could have never been two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison, no countenances so beloved. Now they were as strangers; nay, worse than strangers, for they could never become acquainted. It was a perpetual estrangement. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

There could have never been two hearts so open, no tastes so similar, no feelings so in unison, no countenances so beloved. Now they were as strangers; nay, worse than strangers, for they could never become acquainted. It was a perpetual estrangement.


Quote: She knew that what Marianne and her mother conjectured one moment, they believed the next: that with them, to wish was to hope, and to hope was to expect. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

She knew that what Marianne and her mother conjectured one moment, they believed the next: that with them, to wish was to hope, and to hope was to expect.


Quote: To hope was to expect. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

To hope was to expect.


Quote: Where so many hours have been spent in convincing myself that I am right, is there not some reason to fear I may be wrong? by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Where so many hours have been spent in convincing myself that I am right, is there not some reason to fear I may be wrong?


Quote: I am come, young ladies, in a very moralizing strain, to observe that our pleasures of this world are always to be for, and that we often purchase them at a great disadvantage, giving readi-monied actual happiness for a draft on the future, that may not be honoured. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of Jane Austen quote; white text on black background

I am come, young ladies, in a very moralizing strain, to observe that our pleasures of this world are always to be for, and that we often purchase them at a great disadvantage, giving readi-monied actual happiness for a draft on the future, that may not be honoured.


Quote: That will do extremely well, child. You have delighted us long enough. Let the other young ladies have time to exhibit. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

That will do extremely well, child. You have delighted us long enough. Let the other young ladies have time to exhibit.


Quote: Everybody has their taste in noises as well as in other matters; and sounds are quite innoxious, or most distressing, by their sort rather than their quantity. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Everybody has their taste in noises as well as in other matters; and sounds are quite innoxious, or most distressing, by their sort rather than their quantity.


Quote: If a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him. If she can hesitate as to 'Yes,' she ought to say 'No' directly. It is not a state to be safely entered into with doubtful feelings, with half a heart. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

If a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him. If she can hesitate as to 'Yes,' she ought to say 'No' directly. It is not a state to be safely entered into with doubtful feelings, with half a heart.


Quote: It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a large fortune must be in want of a wife. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that a single man in possession of a large fortune must be in want of a wife.


Quote: I admire all my three sons-in-law highly, said he. Wickham, perhaps, is my favourite; but I think I shall like your husband quite as well as Jane's. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I admire all my three sons-in-law highly, said he. Wickham, perhaps, is my favourite; but I think I shall like your husband quite as well as Jane's.


Quote: Where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation.


Quote: It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It is a truth universally acknowledged that a single man in possession of a good fortune, must be in want of a wife.


Quote: Upon my word, you five your opinion very decidedly for so young a person. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Upon my word, you five your opinion very decidedly for so young a person.


Quote: For herself she was humbled; but she was proud of him. Proud that in a cause of compassion and honour, he had been able to get the better of himself. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

For herself she was humbled; but she was proud of him. Proud that in a cause of compassion and honour, he had been able to get the better of himself.


Quote: You are too sensible a girl to fall in love merely because you are warned against it. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

You are too sensible a girl to fall in love merely because you are warned against it.


Quote: Exertion should always be in proportion to what is required. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Exertion should always be in proportion to what is required.


Quote: Men of sense do not want silly wives. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Men of sense do not want silly wives.


Quote: You may well warn me against such an evil. Human nature is so prone to fall into it! by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

You may well warn me against such an evil. Human nature is so prone to fall into it!


Quote: I should indefinitely prefer a book. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I should indefinitely prefer a book.


Quote: I dearly love a laugh. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I dearly love a laugh.


Quote: The distance is nothing, when one has a motive. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

The distance is nothing, when one has a motive.


Quote: There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

There is a stubbornness about me that never can bear to be frightened at the will of others.


Quote: How earnestly did she then wish that her former opinions had been more reasonable, more moderate! by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

How earnestly did she then wish that her former opinions had been more reasonable, more moderate!


Quote: May we take my uncle's letter to read to her? Take whatever you like, and get away. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

May we take my uncle's letter to read to her? Take whatever you like, and get away.


Quote: Oh hang kitty; what has she to do with it? Come, be quick. Be quick. Where is your sash? by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Oh hang kitty; what has she to do with it? Come, be quick. Be quick. Where is your sash?


Quote: And if I had not a letter to write myself, I might sit by you and admire the evenness of your writing, as another young lady once did. But I have an aunt too, who must not be longer neglected. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

And if I had not a letter to write myself, I might sit by you and admire the evenness of your writing, as another young lady once did. But I have an aunt too, who must not be longer neglected.


Quote: If any young men come for Mary or Kitty, send them in, for I am quite as leisure. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

If any young men come for Mary or Kitty, send them in, for I am quite as leisure.


Quote: What praise is more valuable than the praise of an intelligent servant? by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

What praise is more valuable than the praise of an intelligent servant?


Quote: If you were to give me forty such men, I never could be so happy as you. Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness. No, no, let me shift for myself; and, perhaps, if I have very good luck, I may meet with another Mr. Collins in time. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of Jane Austen quote; white text on black background

If you were to give me forty such men, I never could be so happy as you. Till I have your disposition, your goodness, I never can have your happiness. No, no, let me shift for myself; and, perhaps, if I have very good luck, I may meet with another Mr. Collins in time.


Quote: I am determined that nothing but the deepest love could ever induce me into matrimony. Elizabeth. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I am determined that nothing but the deepest love could ever induce me into matrimony. Elizabeth.


Quote: They parted at last with mutual civility, and possibly a mutual desire of never meeting again. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

They parted at last with mutual civility, and possibly a mutual desire of never meeting again.


Quote: She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

She was convinced that she could have been happy with him, when it was no longer likely they should meet.


Quote: As a daughter she hoped she was not without heart. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

As a daughter she hoped she was not without heart.


Quote: It would be most right, and most wise, and, therefore must involve least suffering. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It would be most right, and most wise, and, therefore must involve least suffering.


Quote: It may be possible to do without dancing entirely. Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury accrue either to body or mind. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It may be possible to do without dancing entirely. Instances have been known of young people passing many, many months successively without being at any ball of any description, and no material injury accrue either to body or mind.


Quote: She was sensible and clever, but eager in everything; her sorrows, her joys, could have no moderation. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

She was sensible and clever, but eager in everything; her sorrows, her joys, could have no moderation.


Quote: I was simple enough to think, that because my faith was plighted to another, there could be no danger in my being with you; and that the consciousness of my engagement was to keep my heart as safe and sacred as my honour. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I was simple enough to think, that because my faith was plighted to another, there could be no danger in my being with you; and that the consciousness of my engagement was to keep my heart as safe and sacred as my honour.


Quote: Mr. Bennet's expectations were fully answered. His cousin was as absurd as he had hoped, and he listened to him with the keenest enjoyment. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Mr. Bennet's expectations were fully answered. His cousin was as absurd as he had hoped, and he listened to him with the keenest enjoyment.


Quote: Miss Bingley's congratulations to her brother, on his approaching marriage, were all that was affectionate and insincere. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Miss Bingley's congratulations to her brother, on his approaching marriage, were all that was affectionate and insincere.


Quote: But Catherine did not know her own advantages -- did not know that a good-looking girl, with an affectionate heart and a very ignorant mind, cannot fail of attracting a clever young man, unless circumstances are particularly untoward. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

But Catherine did not know her own advantages -- did not know that a good-looking girl, with an affectionate heart and a very ignorant mind, cannot fail of attracting a clever young man, unless circumstances are particularly untoward.


Quote: No, I did not promise. I only smirked and bowed, and said the word happy. There was no promise. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

No, I did not promise. I only smirked and bowed, and said the word happy. There was no promise.


Quote: He is a gentleman; I am a gentleman's daughter; so far we are equal. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

He is a gentleman; I am a gentleman's daughter; so far we are equal.


Quote: Reflection must be reserved for solitary hours; whenever she was alone, she gave way to it as the greatest relief; and not a day went by without a solitary walk, in which she might indulge in all the delight of unpleasant recollections. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Reflection must be reserved for solitary hours; whenever she was alone, she gave way to it as the greatest relief; and not a day went by without a solitary walk, in which she might indulge in all the delight of unpleasant recollections.


Quote: Her own thoughts and reflections were habitually her best companions. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Her own thoughts and reflections were habitually her best companions.


Quote: Poor woman! She probably thought change of air might agree with many of her children. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Poor woman! She probably thought change of air might agree with many of her children.


Quote: I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I have been meditating on the very great pleasure which a pair of fine eyes in the face of a pretty woman can bestow.


Quote: An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

An unhappy alternative is before you, Elizabeth. From this day you must be a stranger to one of your parents. Your mother will never see you again if you do not marry Mr. Collins, and I will never see you again if you do.


Quote: He then departed, to make himself still more interesting, in the midst of a heavy rain. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

He then departed, to make himself still more interesting, in the midst of a heavy rain.


Quote: She began to curl her hair and long for balls. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

She began to curl her hair and long for balls.


Quote: But indeed I would rather have nothing but tea. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

But indeed I would rather have nothing but tea.


Quote: I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I have a high respect for your nerves. They are my old friends.


Quote: You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

You must learn some of my philosophy. Think only of the past as its remembrance gives you pleasure.


Quote: Where shall we see a better daughter, or a kinder sister, or a truer friend? by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Where shall we see a better daughter, or a kinder sister, or a truer friend?


Quote: It does not come to me in quite so direct a line as that; it takes a bend or two, but nothing of consequence. The stream is as good as at first; the little rubbish it collects in the turnings is easily moved away. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It does not come to me in quite so direct a line as that; it takes a bend or two, but nothing of consequence. The stream is as good as at first; the little rubbish it collects in the turnings is easily moved away.


Quote: Each found her greatest safety in silence. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Each found her greatest safety in silence.


Quote: I assure you. I have no notion of treating men with such respect. That is the way to spoil them. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I assure you. I have no notion of treating men with such respect. That is the way to spoil them.


Quote: The more I see of the world, the more am i dissatisfied with it; and everyday confirms my belief of the inconsistencies of all human. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

The more I see of the world, the more am i dissatisfied with it; and everyday confirms my belief of the inconsistencies of all human.


Quote: Almost anything is possible with time. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Almost anything is possible with time.


Quote: I walk: I prefer walking. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I walk: I prefer walking.


Quote: I am not at all in a humor for writing; I must write on till I am. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I am not at all in a humor for writing; I must write on till I am.


Quote: I want nothing but death. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I want nothing but death.


Quote: When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable If I have not an excellent library. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

When I have a house of my own, I shall be miserable If I have not an excellent library.


Quote: I may have lost my heart, but not my self-control. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I may have lost my heart, but not my self-control.


Quote: My good opinion once lost is lost forever. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

My good opinion once lost is lost forever.


Quote: Run mad as often as you choose, but do not faint! by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Run mad as often as you choose, but do not faint!


Quote: Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Vanity and pride are different things, though the words are often used synonymously. A person may be proud without being vain. Pride relates more to our opinion of ourselves, vanity to what we would have others think of us.


Quote: And sometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

And sometimes I have kept my feelings to myself, because I could find no language to describe them in.


Quote: What are men to rocks and mountains? by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

What are men to rocks and mountains?


Quote: I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading.

Longer Version/[Notes]:

I declare after all there is no enjoyment like reading. How much sooner one tires of any thing than of a book.


Quote: Mrs. Hall of Sherbourn was brought to bed yesterday of a dead child, some weeks before she expected, oweing to a fright.--I suppose she happened unawares to look at her husband. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Mrs. Hall of Sherbourn was brought to bed yesterday of a dead child, some weeks before she expected, oweing to a fright.--I suppose she happened unawares to look at her husband.


Quote: Half the sum of attraction, on either side, might have been enough, for he had nothing to do, and she had hardly anybody to love. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Half the sum of attraction, on either side, might have been enough, for he had nothing to do, and she had hardly anybody to love.


Quote: Family squabbling is the greatest evil of all. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Family squabbling is the greatest evil of all.


Quote: I am not one of those who neglect the reigning to bow to the rising sun. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I am not one of those who neglect the reigning to bow to the rising sun.


Quote: I wish nature had made such hearts as yours more common. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I wish nature had made such hearts as yours more common.


Quote: We have in fact all the comfort of an excellent kitchen garden, without the constant eyesore of it's formalities, or the yearly nuisance of it's decaying vegetation. Who can endure a cabbage bed in October! by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

We have in fact all the comfort of an excellent kitchen garden, without the constant eyesore of it's formalities, or the yearly nuisance of it's decaying vegetation. Who can endure a cabbage bed in October!


Quote: No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy would have supposed her born to be a heroine. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy would have supposed her born to be a heroine.


Quote: Anne did think on the question with perfect decision, and said as much in replay as her own feelings could accomplish, or as his seemed able to bear, for he was too much affected to renew the subject -- and when he spoke again, it was something totally different. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Anne did think on the question with perfect decision, and said as much in replay as her own feelings could accomplish, or as his seemed able to bear, for he was too much affected to renew the subject -- and when he spoke again, it was something totally different.


Quote: The loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable -- that one false step involves in her endless ruin -- that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful -- and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behavior towards the undeserving of the opposite sex. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of Jane Austen quote; white text on black background

The loss of virtue in a female is irretrievable -- that one false step involves in her endless ruin -- that her reputation is no less brittle than it is beautiful -- and that she cannot be too much guarded in her behavior towards the undeserving of the opposite sex.


Quote: As for admiration, it was always very welcome when it came, but she did not depend on it. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

As for admiration, it was always very welcome when it came, but she did not depend on it.


Quote: The house seemed to have all the comforts of little Children, dirt and litter. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

The house seemed to have all the comforts of little Children, dirt and litter.


Quote: A scheme of which every part promises delight, can never be successful; and general disappointment is only warded off by the defence of some little peculiar vexation. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

A scheme of which every part promises delight, can never be successful; and general disappointment is only warded off by the defence of some little peculiar vexation.


Quote: You may ask questions which I shall not choose to answer. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

You may ask questions which I shall not choose to answer.


Quote: And so ended his affection, said Elizabeth impatiently. There has
been many a one, I fancy, overcome in the same way. I wonder who first
discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!
I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love, said Darcy. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

And so ended his affection, said Elizabeth impatiently. There has
been many a one, I fancy, overcome in the same way. I wonder who first
discovered the efficacy of poetry in driving away love!
I have been used to consider poetry as the food of love, said Darcy.


Quote: There is a monsterous deal of stupid quizzing, and common-place nonsense talked, but scarcely any wit. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

There is a monsterous deal of stupid quizzing, and common-place nonsense talked, but scarcely any wit.


Quote: I will only add, God bless you. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I will only add, God bless you.


Quote: I lay it down as a general rule, Harriet, that if a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I lay it down as a general rule, Harriet, that if a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him.


Quote: I am determined that only the deepest love will induce me into matrimony. So, I shall end an old maid, and teach your ten children to embroider cushions and play their instruments very ill. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I am determined that only the deepest love will induce me into matrimony. So, I shall end an old maid, and teach your ten children to embroider cushions and play their instruments very ill.


Quote: Let us never underestimate the power of a well-written letter. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Let us never underestimate the power of a well-written letter.


Quote: Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing after all. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing after all.


Quote: My idea of good company...is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.' 
'You are mistaken,' said he gently, 'that is not good company, that is the best. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

My idea of good company...is the company of clever, well-informed people, who have a great deal of conversation; that is what I call good company.'
'You are mistaken,' said he gently, 'that is not good company, that is the best.


Quote: All the privilege I claim for my own sex, is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

All the privilege I claim for my own sex, is that of loving longest, when existence or when hope is gone.


Quote: I have always maintained the importance of Aunts. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I have always maintained the importance of Aunts.


Quote: The very first moment I beheld him, my heart was irrevocably gone. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

The very first moment I beheld him, my heart was irrevocably gone.


Quote: I have no pretensions whatever to that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I have no pretensions whatever to that kind of elegance which consists in tormenting a respectable man.


Quote: The bride and her mother could neither of them talk fast enough;. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

The bride and her mother could neither of them talk fast enough;.


Quote: She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me, and I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

She is tolerable, but not handsome enough to tempt me, and I am in no humor at present to give consequence to young ladies who are slighted by other men.


Quote: An agreeable manner may set off handsome features, but can never alter plain ones. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

An agreeable manner may set off handsome features, but can never alter plain ones.


Quote: She had nothing to wish otherwise, but that the days did not pass so swiftly. It was a delightful visit;--perfect, in being much too short. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

She had nothing to wish otherwise, but that the days did not pass so swiftly. It was a delightful visit;--perfect, in being much too short.


Quote: Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, And waste its fragrance on the desert air. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Full many a flower is born to blush unseen, And waste its fragrance on the desert air.


Quote: Sometimes the last person on earth you want to be with is the one person you can't be without. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Sometimes the last person on earth you want to be with is the one person you can't be without.


Quote: Where people are really attached, poverty itself is wealth. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Where people are really attached, poverty itself is wealth.


Quote: Books -- oh! no. I am sure we never read the same, or not with the same feelings. I am sorry you think so; but if that be the case, there can at least be no want of subject. We may compare our different opinions. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Books -- oh! no. I am sure we never read the same, or not with the same feelings. I am sorry you think so; but if that be the case, there can at least be no want of subject. We may compare our different opinions.


Quote: Good apple pies are a considerable part of our domestic happiness. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Good apple pies are a considerable part of our domestic happiness.


Quote: Nobody is healthy in London, nobody can be. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Nobody is healthy in London, nobody can be.


Quote: None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

None of us want to be in calm waters all our lives.


Quote: One has not great hopes from Birmingham. I always say there is something direful in the sound. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

One has not great hopes from Birmingham. I always say there is something direful in the sound.


Quote: In spite of all her faults she knew she was dear to him; might she not say, very dear? by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

In spite of all her faults she knew she was dear to him; might she not say, very dear?


Quote: Elizabeth had never been more at a loss to make her feelings appear what they were not. It was necessary to laugh, when she would rather have cried. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Elizabeth had never been more at a loss to make her feelings appear what they were not. It was necessary to laugh, when she would rather have cried.


Quote: Here and there, human nature may be great in times of trial, but generally speaking it is its weakness and not its strength that appears in a sick chamber. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Here and there, human nature may be great in times of trial, but generally speaking it is its weakness and not its strength that appears in a sick chamber.


Quote: I have none of the usual inducements of women to marry. Were I to fall in love, indeed, it would be a different thing! but I have never been in love; it is not my way, or my nature; and I do not think I ever shall. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I have none of the usual inducements of women to marry. Were I to fall in love, indeed, it would be a different thing! but I have never been in love; it is not my way, or my nature; and I do not think I ever shall.


Quote: Oh, Lizzy! do anything rather than marry without affection. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Oh, Lizzy! do anything rather than marry without affection.


Quote: Perhaps I did not always love him so well as I do now. But in such cases as these, a good memory is unpardonable. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Perhaps I did not always love him so well as I do now. But in such cases as these, a good memory is unpardonable.


Quote: In a letter from Bath to her sister, Cassandra, one senses her frustration at her sheltered existence, Tuesday, 12 May 1801. Another stupid party ... with six people to look on, and talk nonsense to each other. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

In a letter from Bath to her sister, Cassandra, one senses her frustration at her sheltered existence, Tuesday, 12 May 1801. Another stupid party ... with six people to look on, and talk nonsense to each other.


Quote: Do not consider me now as an elegant female intending to plague you, but as a rational creature speaking the truth from her heart. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Do not consider me now as an elegant female intending to plague you, but as a rational creature speaking the truth from her heart.


Quote: Business, you know, may bring money, but friendship hardly ever does. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Business, you know, may bring money, but friendship hardly ever does.


Quote: It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It was gratitude; gratitude, not merely for having once loved her, but for loving her still well enough to forgive all the petulance and acrimony of her manner in rejecting him, and all the unjust accusations accompanying her rejection.


Quote: But for my own part, if a book is well written, I always find it too short. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

But for my own part, if a book is well written, I always find it too short.


Quote: My ideas flow so rapidly that I have not time to express them -- by which means my letters sometimes convey no ideas at all to my correspondents. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

My ideas flow so rapidly that I have not time to express them -- by which means my letters sometimes convey no ideas at all to my correspondents.


Quote: There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

There certainly was some great mismanagement in the education of those two young men. One has got all the goodness, and the other all the appearance of it.


Quote: What strange creatures brothers are! by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

What strange creatures brothers are!


Quote: She was stronger alone. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

She was stronger alone.

Longer Version/[Notes]:

She was stronger alone; and her own good sense so well supported her, that her firmness was as unshaken, her appearance of cheerfulness as invariable, as, with regrets so poignant and so fresh, it was possible for them to be.


Quote: If I could not be persuaded into doing what I thought wrong, I will never be tricked into it. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

If I could not be persuaded into doing what I thought wrong, I will never be tricked into it.


Quote: Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised or a little mistaken. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Seldom, very seldom, does complete truth belong to any human disclosure; seldom can it happen that something is not a little disguised or a little mistaken.


Quote: Respect for right conduct is felt by every body. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Respect for right conduct is felt by every body.


Quote: It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;--it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It is not time or opportunity that is to determine intimacy;--it is disposition alone. Seven years would be insufficient to make some people acquainted with each other, and seven days are more than enough for others.


Quote: The pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

The pleasantness of an employment does not always evince its propriety.


Quote: A fondness for reading, properly directed, must be an education in itself. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

A fondness for reading, properly directed, must be an education in itself.


Quote: It is your turn to say something now, Mr. Darcy. I talked about the dance, and you ought to make some kind of remark on the size of the room, or the number of couples. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

It is your turn to say something now, Mr. Darcy. I talked about the dance, and you ought to make some kind of remark on the size of the room, or the number of couples.


Quote: I frequently observe that one pretty face would be followed by five and thirty frights. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I frequently observe that one pretty face would be followed by five and thirty frights.


Quote: To look almost pretty is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain the first fifteen years of her life than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

To look almost pretty is an acquisition of higher delight to a girl who has been looking plain the first fifteen years of her life than a beauty from her cradle can ever receive.


Quote: Without music, life would be a blank to me. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Without music, life would be a blank to me.


Quote: Where the wound has been given, there must the cure be found, if anywhere. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Where the wound has been given, there must the cure be found, if anywhere.


Quote: I will be calm. I will be mistress of myself. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I will be calm. I will be mistress of myself.


Quote: I wish, as well as everybody else, to be perfectly happy; but like everybody else, it must be in my own way. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I wish, as well as everybody else, to be perfectly happy; but like everybody else, it must be in my own way.


Quote: A fondness for reading, which, properly directed, must be an education in itself. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

A fondness for reading, which, properly directed, must be an education in itself.


Quote: If a book is well written, I always find it too short. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

If a book is well written, I always find it too short.


Quote: Children of the same family, the same blood, with the same first associations and habits, have some means of enjoyment in their power, which no subsequent connections can supply. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

Children of the same family, the same blood, with the same first associations and habits, have some means of enjoyment in their power, which no subsequent connections can supply.


Quote: I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun. by author Jane Austen overlaid on photo of photo of author Jane Austen with quote

I cannot fix on the hour, or the spot, or the look or the words, which laid the foundation. It is too long ago. I was in the middle before I knew that I had begun.


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