Inspirational quotes to feed your soul and brighten your day.

201 Inspiring Quotes by John Keats

  • Last updated Jun 28 2021

Welcome to our collection of quotes by John Keats.

Wikipedia Summary for John Keats

John Keats (31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) was an English Romantic poet. He was prominent in the second generation of Romantic poets, with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, though his poems were in publication for only four years before he died of tuberculosis at the age of 25. They were not generally well received by critics in his lifetime, but his fame grew rapidly after his death. By the end of the century he had been placed within the canon of English literature and had become the inspiration for the Pre-Raphaelite Brotherhood, with a strong influence on many writers; the Encyclopædia Britannica described one ode as "one of the final masterpieces".

Jorge Luis Borges called his first encounter with Keats' work an experience that he felt all of his life. It had a style "heavily loaded with sensualities", notably in the series of odes. It was typical of the Romantics to accentuate extreme emotion through emphasis on natural imagery. Today his poems and letters remain among the most popular and analysed in English literature. Especially acclaimed are "Ode to a Nightingale", "Sleep and Poetry" and the famous sonnet "On First Looking into Chapman's Homer".

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

Longer Version:

The excellence of every art is its intensity, capable of making all disagreeables evaporate, from their being in close relationship with beauty and truth.


--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats


--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats


--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

Longer Version:

Give me books, fruit, French wine and fine weather and a little music out of doors, played by someone I do not know. I admire lolling on a lawn by a water-lilied pond to eat white currants and see goldfish: and go to the fair in the evening if I'm good. There is not hope for that -one is sure to get into some mess before evening.


--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats


--John Keats

Longer Version:

Bright star, would I were steadfast as thou art -- - Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night And watching, with eternal lids apart, Like nature's patient, sleepless Eremite, The moving waters at their priestlike task Of pure ablution round earth's human shores, Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask Of snow upon the mountains and the moors -- - No -- -yet still stedfast, still unchangeable, Pillowed upon my fair love's ripening breast, To feel for ever its soft fall and swell, Awake for ever in a sweet unrest, Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath, And so live ever -- -or else swoon in death.


--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

Longer Version:

My mind has been the most discontented and restless one that ever was put into a body too small for it.... I never felt my mind repose upon anything with complete and undistracted enjoyment- upon no person but you. When you are in the room my thoughts never fly out of window: you always concentrate my whole senses.


--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats


--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

Longer Version:

Don't be discouraged by a failure. It can be a positive experience. Failure is, in a sense, the highway to success, inasmuch as every discovery of what is false leads us to seek earnestly after what is true, and every fresh experience points out some.


--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

Longer Version:

A thing of beauty is a joy forever: its loveliness increases; it will never pass into nothingness.



--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

Longer Version:

Much have I traveled in the realms of gold, And many goodly states and kingdoms seen; Round many western islands have I been Which bards in fealty to Apollo hold. Oft of one wide expanse had I been told That deep-brow'd Homer ruled as his demesne, Yet did I never breathe its pure serene Till I heard Chapman speak out loud and bold: Then felt I like some watcher of the skies When a new planet swims into his ken; Or like stout Cortez when with eagle eyes He stared at the Pacific, and all his men Look'd at each other with a wild surmise, Silent, upon a peak in Darien.


--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

Longer Version:

You are always new. THe last of your kisses was ever the sweetest; the last smile the brightest; the last movement the gracefullest. When you pass'd my window home yesterday, I was fill'd with as much admiration as if I had then seen you for the first time...Even if you did not love me I could not help an entire devotion to you.


--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats

Longer Version:

I have been astonished that men could die martyrs
for their religion --
I have shuddered at it,
I shudder no more.
I could be martyred for my religion.
Love is my religion
and I could die for that.
I could die for you.
My Creed is Love and you are its only tenet.


--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

Longer Version:

Nothing ever becomes real till experienced -- even a proverb is no proverb until your life has illustrated it.


--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats


--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats


--John Keats

--John Keats

Longer Version:

Heard melodies are sweet, but those unheard Are sweeter: therefore, ye soft pipes, play on; Not to the sensual ear, but, more endear'd, Pipe to the spirit ditties of no tone. Fair youth, beneath the trees, thou canst not leave Thy song, nor ever can those trees be bare; Bold Lover, never, never canst thou kiss, Though winning near the goal yet, do not grieve; She cannot fade, though thou hast not thy bliss, For ever wilt thou love, and she be fair!


--John Keats

--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats
--John Keats

We welcome your feedback, error reports, feature requests, constructive criticism, and quote submissions here: Contact Us.

We wish you a perfect day!