photo of Samuel Adams
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60 Inspiring Quotes by Samuel Adams

Welcome to our collection of quotes (with shareable picture quotes) by Samuel Adams. We hope you enjoy pondering them and that you will share them widely.

Wikipedia Summary for Samuel Adams

Samuel Adams (September 27 [O.

S. September 16] 1722 – October 2, 1803) was an American statesman, political philosopher, and one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. He was a politician in colonial Massachusetts, a leader of the movement that became the American Revolution, and one of the architects of the principles of American republicanism that shaped the political culture of the United States. He was a second cousin to his fellow Founding Father, President John Adams.

Adams was born in Boston, brought up in a religious and politically active family. A graduate of Harvard College, he was an unsuccessful businessman and tax collector before concentrating on politics. He was an influential official of the Massachusetts House of Representatives and the Boston Town Meeting in the 1760s, and he became a part of a movement opposed to the British Parliament's efforts to tax the British American colonies without their consent. His 1768 Massachusetts Circular Letter calling for colonial non-cooperation prompted the occupation of Boston by British soldiers, eventually resulting in the Boston Massacre of 1770. Adams and his colleagues devised a committee of correspondence system in 1772 to help coordinate resistance to what he saw as the British government's attempts to violate the British Constitution at the expense of the colonies, which linked like-minded Patriots throughout the Thirteen Colonies. Continued resistance to British policy resulted in the 1773 Boston Tea Party and the coming of the American Revolution.

Parliament passed the Coercive Acts in 1774, at which time Adams attended the Continental Congress in Philadelphia which was convened to coordinate a colonial response. He helped guide Congress towards issuing the Continental Association in 1774 and the Declaration of Independence in 1776, and he helped draft the Articles of Confederation and the Massachusetts Constitution. Adams returned to Massachusetts after the American Revolution, where he served in the state senate and was eventually elected governor.

Samuel Adams later became a controversial figure in American history. Accounts written in the 19th century praised him as someone who had been steering his fellow colonists towards independence long before the outbreak of the Revolutionary War. This view gave way to negative assessments of Adams in the first half of the 20th century, in which he was portrayed as a master of propaganda who provoked mob violence to achieve his goals. Both of these interpretations have been challenged by some modern scholars, who argue that these traditional depictions of Adams are myths contradicted by the historical record.

--Samuel Adams

Longer Version:

Among the natural rights of the colonists are these: first, a right to life; second, to liberty; third, to property; together with the right to support and defend them in the best manner they can. These are evident branches of ... the duty of self-preservation, commonly called the first law of nature. All men have a right to remain in a state of nature as long as they please; and in case of intolerable oppression, civil or religious, to leave the society they belong to, and ernter into another.... Now what liberty can there be where property is taken away without consent?


--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams

Longer Version:

The Constitution be never construed to authorize Congress to infringe the just liberty of the press, or the rights of conscience; or to prevent the people of the United States, who are peaceable citizens, from keeping their own arms.


--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
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--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams

--Samuel Adams

Longer Version:

A general dissolution of principles and manners will more surely overthrow the liberties of America than the whole force of the common enemy. While the people are virtuous they cannot be subdued; but when once they lose their virtue then will be ready to surrender their liberties to the first external or internal invader.


--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams


--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams

Longer Version:

If taxes are laid upon us in any shape without our having a legal representation where they are laid, are we not reduced from the character of free subjects to the miserable state of tributary slaves? We claim British rights not by charter only! We are born to them.


--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams

--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
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--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
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--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
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--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams
--Samuel Adams

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