Inspirational quotes to feed your soul and brighten your day.

270 Inspiring Quotes by Sun Tzu

  • Last updated Oct 07 2021

Welcome to our collection of quotes by Sun Tzu.

Wikipedia Summary for Sun Tzu

Sun Tzu ( soon DZOO, soon SOO; Chinese: 孫子; pinyin: Sūnzǐ) was a Chinese general, military strategist, writer, and philosopher who lived in the Eastern Zhou period of ancient China. Sun Tzu is traditionally credited as the author of The Art of War, an influential work of military strategy that has affected both Western and East Asian philosophy and military thinking. His works focus much more on alternatives to battle, such as stratagem, delay, the use of spies and alternatives to war itself, the making and keeping of alliances, the uses of deceit, and a willingness to submit, at least temporarily, to more powerful foes. Sun Tzu is revered in Chinese and East Asian culture as a legendary historical and military figure. His birth name was Sun Wu (Chinese: 孫武) and he was known outside of his family by his courtesy name Changqing (Chinese: 長卿). The name Sun Tzu by which he is best known in the Western World is an honorific which means "Master Sun".

Sun Tzu's historicity is uncertain. The Han dynasty historian Sima Qian and other traditional Chinese historians placed him as a minister to King Helü of Wu and dated his lifetime to 544–496 BC. Modern scholars accepting his historicity place the extant text of The Art of War in the later Warring States period based on its style of composition and its descriptions of warfare. Traditional accounts state that the general's descendant Sun Bin wrote a treatise on military tactics, also titled The Art of War. Since Sun Wu and Sun Bin were referred to as Sun Tzu in classical Chinese texts, some historians believed them identical, prior to the rediscovery of Sun Bin's treatise in 1972.

Sun Tzu's work has been praised and employed in East Asian warfare since its composition. During the twentieth century, The Art of War grew in popularity and saw practical use in Western society as well. It continues to influence many competitive endeavors in the world, including culture, politics, business and sports, as well as modern warfare.

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

If you know the enemy and know yourself, you need not fear the result of a hundred battles. If you know yourself but not the enemy, for every victory you will also suffer a defeat. If you know neither the enemy nor yourself you will succumb in every battle.


--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

Throw the troops into a position from which there is no escape and even when faced with death they will not flee. For if prepared to die, what can they not achieve? Then officers and men together put forth their utmost efforts. In a desperate situation they fear nothing; when there is no way out they stand firm. Deep in a hostile land they are bound together, and there, where there is no alternative, they will engage the enemy in hand to hand combat.

Thus, such troops need no encouragement to be vigilant. Without extorting their support the general obtains it; without inviting their affection he gains it; without demanding their trust he wins it.


--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

A clever general... avoids an army when its spirit is keen, but attacks it when it is sluggish and inclined to return. This is the art of studying moods. Disciplined and calm, he awaits the appearance of disorder and hubbub among the enemy. This is the art of retaining self-possession.


--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

In all fighting, the direct method may be used for joining battle, but indirect methods will be needed in order to secure victory. Indirect tactics, efficiently applied, are inexhaustible as Heaven and Earth, unending as the flow of rivers and streams; like the sun and moon, they end but to begin anew; like the four seasons, they pass away to return once more.


--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

When envoys are sent with compliments in their mouths, it is a sign that the enemy wishes for a truce. If the enemy's troops march up angrily and remain facing ours for a long time without either joining battle or removing demands, the situation is one that requires great vigilance and circumspection. To begin by bluster, but afterward to take fright at the enemy's numbers, shows a supreme lack of intelligence.


--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu


--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

Know the enemy, know yourself and victory is never in doubt, not in a hundred battles.


--Sun Tzu


--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

Secret operations are essential in war; upon them the army relies to make its every move. An army without secret agents is exactly like a man without eyes or ears.


--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

He who wishes to fight must first count the cost. When you engage in actual fighting, if victory is long in coming, then men's weapons will grow dull and their ardor will be dampened. If you lay siege to a town, you will exhaust your strength.


--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

So in war, the way is to avoid what is strong and to strike at what is weak. Water shapes its course according to the nature of the ground over which it flows; the soldier works out his victory in relation to the foe whom he is facing.


--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

O divine art of subtlety and secrecy! Through you we learn to be invisible, through you inaudible and hence we can hold the enemy's fate in our hands.


--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

There are not more than five musical notes, yet the combinations of these five give rise to more melodies than can ever be heard.There are not more than five primary colors, yet in combination they produce more hues than can ever been seen.There are not more than five cardinal tastes, yet combinations of them yield more flavors than can ever be tasted.


--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

The skillful leader subdues the enemy's troops without any fighting; he captures their cities without laying siege to them; he overthrows their kingdom without lengthy operations in the field.


--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu


--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

The opportunity to secure ourselves against defeat lies in our own hands, but the opportunity of defeating the enemy is provided by the enemy himself.


--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

In war, numbers alone confer no advantage. Do not advance relying on sheer military power. It is sufficient to estimate the enemy situation correctly and to concentrate your strength to capture him. There is no more to it than this. He who lacks foresight and underestimates his enemy will surely be captured by him.


--Sun Tzu


--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

All warfare is based on deception. Therefore, when capable, feign incapacity; when active, inactivity. When near, make it appear that you are far away; when far away, that you are to lure him; feign disorder and strike him. When he concentrates, prepare against him; where he is strong, avoid him. Anger his general and confuse him. Pretend inferiority and encourage his arrogance.



--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu


--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu



--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu


--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

Let your plans be dark and impenetrable as night, and when you move, fall like a thunderbolt.


--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu


--Sun Tzu

--Sun Tzu
--Sun Tzu

Longer Version:

When the enemy is at ease, be able to weary him; when well fed, to starve him; when at rest, to make him move. Appear at places to which he must hasten; move swiftly where he does not expect you.


We wish you a perfect day!