Inspirational quotes to feed your soul and brighten your day.

413 Inspiring Quotes by Theodore Roosevelt

  • Last updated Jun 28 2021

Welcome to our collection of quotes by Theodore Roosevelt.

Wikipedia Summary for Theodore Roosevelt

Theodore Roosevelt Jr. ( ROH-zə-velt; October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919), often referred to as Teddy or his initials T. R., was an American statesman, conservationist, naturalist, historian, and writer, who served as the 26th president of the United States from 1901 to 1909. He previously served as 33rd governor of New York from 1899 to 1900 and the 25th vice president of the United States from March to September 1901. Roosevelt emerged as a leader of the Republican Party and became a driving force for anti-trust and Progressive policies.

Roosevelt was a sickly child with debilitating asthma but partly overcame his health problems by embracing a strenuous lifestyle. He integrated his exuberant personality, a vast range of interests and achievements into a "cowboy" persona defined by robust masculinity. He was home-schooled and began a lifelong naturalist avocation before attending Harvard. His book The Naval War of 1812 (1882) established his reputation as a learned historian and popular writer. Upon entering politics, he became the leader of the reform faction of Republicans in New York's state legislature. His wife and mother both died in rapid succession, and he began to frequent a cattle ranch in the Dakotas. He served as Assistant Secretary of the Navy under President William McKinley but resigned to lead the Rough Riders during the Spanish–American War. Returning a war hero, he was elected governor of New York in 1898. After Vice President Garret Hobart died in 1899, the New York state party leadership convinced McKinley to accept Roosevelt as his running mate in the 1900 election. Roosevelt campaigned vigorously, and the McKinley–Roosevelt ticket won a landslide victory based on a platform of peace, prosperity, and conservation.

Roosevelt took office as vice president in 1901 and assumed the presidency at age 42 after McKinley was assassinated the following September. He remains the youngest person to become President of the United States. Roosevelt was a leader of the progressive movement and championed his "Square Deal" domestic policies, promising the average citizen fairness, breaking of trusts, regulation of railroads, and pure food and drugs. He prioritized conservation and established national parks, forests, and monuments intended to preserve the nation's natural resources. In foreign policy, he focused on Central America where he began construction of the Panama Canal. He expanded the Navy and sent the Great White Fleet on a world tour to project American naval power. His successful efforts to broker the end of the Russo-Japanese War won him the 1906 Nobel Peace Prize. Roosevelt was elected to a full term in 1904 and continued to promote progressive policies. He groomed his close friend William Howard Taft to succeed him in the 1908 presidential election.

Roosevelt grew frustrated with Taft's brand of conservatism and belatedly tried to win the 1912 Republican nomination for president. He failed, walked out, and founded the Progressive Party. He ran in the 1912 presidential election and the split allowed the Democratic nominee Woodrow Wilson to win the election. Following the defeat, Roosevelt led a two-year expedition to the Amazon basin where he nearly died of tropical disease. During World War I, he criticized Wilson for keeping the country out of the war; his offer to lead volunteers to France was rejected. He considered running for president again in 1920, but his health continued to deteriorate. He died in 1919. He is generally ranked in polls of historians and political scientists as one of the five best presidents.


--Theodore Roosevelt



--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt

Longer Version:

No ordinary work done by a man is either as hard or as responsible as the work of a woman who is bringing up a family of small children; for upon her time and strength demands are made not only every hour of the day but often every hour of the night.



--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt

Longer Version:

The only man who makes no mistakes is the man who never does anything. Do not be afraid to make mistakes providing you do not make the same one twice.


--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt

Longer Version:

Behind the ostensible government sits enthroned an invisible government owing no allegiance and acknowledging no responsibility to the people. To destroy this invisible government, to befoul the unholy alliance between corrupt business and corrupt politics is the first task of the statesmanship of today.




--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

Longer Version:

The first requisite of a good citizen in this Republic of ours is that he shall be able and willing to pull his weight; that he shall not be a mere passenger, but shall do his share in the work that each generation of us finds ready to hand; and, furthermore, that in doing his work he shall show, not only the capacity for sturdy self-help, but also self-respecting regard for the rights of others.


--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt

Longer Version:

Conservation means development as much as it does protection. I recognize the right and duty of this generation to develop and use the natural resources of our land; but I do not recognize the right to waste them, or to rob, by wasteful use, the generations that come after us.


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt



--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

Longer Version:

There is no room in this country for hyphenated Americanism. When I refer to hyphenated Americans, I do not refer to naturalized Americans. Some of the very best Americans I have ever known were naturalized Americans, Americans born abroad. But a hyphenated American is not an American at all.


--Theodore Roosevelt








--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt




--Theodore Roosevelt




--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt



--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt




--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt




--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

Longer Version:

The most ultimately righteous of all wars is a war with savages, though it is apt to be also the most terrible and inhuman. The rude, fierce settler who drives the savage from the land lays all civilized mankind under a debt to him. ...It is of incalculable importance that America, Australia, and Siberia should pass out of the hands of their red, black, and yellow aboriginal owners, and become the heritage of the dominant world races.


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt



--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt



--Theodore Roosevelt




--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt




--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

Longer Version:

There are no words that can tell the hidden spirit of the wilderness, that can reveal its mystery, its melancholy and its charm. There is a delight in the hardy life of the open... Apart from this, yet mingled with it, is the strong attraction of the silent places, of the large tropic moons, and the splendor of the new stars; where the wanderer sees the awful glory of sunrise and sunset in the wide waste spaces of the earth, unworn of man, and changed only by the slow change of the ages through time everlasting.







--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

Longer Version:

A President has a great chance; his position is almost that of a king and a prime minister rolled into one. Once he has left office he cannot do very much; and he is a fool if he fails to realize it all and to be profoundly thankful for having had the great chance.


--Theodore Roosevelt



--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

Longer Version:

The Armenian massacre was the greatest crime of the war, and the failure to act against Turkey is to condone it the failure to deal radically with the Turkish horror means that all talk of guaranteeing the future peace of the world is mischievous nonsense.


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt


--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt



--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

--Theodore Roosevelt
--Theodore Roosevelt

We welcome your feedback, error reports, feature requests, constructive criticism, and quote submissions here: Contact Us.

We wish you a perfect day!